A social media bio mistake that means no one can find you

Social media bio words count in search (courtesy jonhoward on Flickr CC)
Word (courtesy jonhoward on Flickr Creative Commons)

(Part of my “Better Online Content” series of posts: quick tips on creating more effective content that takes advantage of the social web’s unique publishing environment.)

This is a simple thing to check and fix on your Twitter and/or Facebook Page account bio.

Your account name, and the words in the text of your account bio/description, are all crawl-able by search engines. Those keywords should make it very clear who you are, and what you do.

Too often, I see a simple mistake….the account name is squished together and not separated into searchable words.

(“Squished together” is not the most elegant term, I know, but it explains the problem.)

For example, a New Mexico town’s CVB (Convention and Visitors Bureau) Twitter handle might be @VisitSmithvilleNM, but you do not want the name of the account to also be VisitSmithvilleNM.

It needs to be Visit Smithville NM, not VisitSmithvilleNM, so that search engines will associate the account with Smithville, New Mexico.

I know it’s hard to believe that the lack of a few spaces makes that much of a difference to search engine bots and therefore, a destination’s online visibility, but it does.

Social media accounts have a lot of “Google juice” – they will always show up at the top of search results for a destination, attraction, hotel, or tourism partner business brand name.

Do yourself an SEO (Search Engine Optimization) favor, and make sure that your social media bio words are clear, separated, and searchable.

“Squished-together” account words make it harder for people to find you.

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About Sheila Scarborough

I’m a writer and speaker specializing in tourism, travel, and social media. Co-founder of Tourism Currents (training in social media for tourism) and the Perceptive Travel Blog.

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