Why social media autoposting is often a bad idea

Screenshot of what a CVB or DMO Twitter stream looks like when it is auto-posted from Facebook
Screenshot of what a CVB or DMO Twitter stream looks like when it is auto-posted from Facebook

This is what a Twitter stream looks like when Facebook updates are automatically shared as tweets (screenshot doctored to spare embarrassment.)

Because of the 140 character limit on Twitter, most Facebook updates are too long, so they are cut off and the reader must go to Facebook (via the dead-giveaway “fb.me” URL) to read the rest of the post. Other tweets are just links going back to Facebook.

Does any of this gibberish look helpful to a visitor who is trying to connect with a destination on Twitter?

There is no indication that this account is interacting in any way with its Twitter followers, or doing anything but staying in one-way broadcast mode via the auto-posting megaphone….and that is totally ineffective in social media.

You wouldn’t run a radio spot on TV.

You wouldn’t submit a brochure as a magazine ad.

Don’t ruin your power to tell your destination’s story to the world by “saving time” with auto-posting. Craft the content to fit the platform.

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